Georg Philipp Telemann, a prolific and influential figure in the Baroque era, left an indelible mark on the landscape of classical music. Born on March 14, 1681, in Magdeburg, Germany, Telemann displayed an early aptitude for music, mastering several instruments and showing remarkable compositional talent. Telemann's musical journey began with his studies in law at the University of Leipzig, but his passion for music quickly took precedence. He immersed himself in Leipzig's vibrant musical scene, where he encountered the works of Johann Sebastian Bach and other notable composers of the time. Despite his father's objections, Telemann pursued a career in music, a decision that would shape the course of his life.
In the realm of classical music, few names resonate with as much brilliance and innovation as Georg Philipp Telemann. Born on March 14, 1681, in Magdeburg, Germany, Telemann was a prolific composer and multi-instrumentalist who left an indelible mark on the Baroque era. His extraordinary talent, tireless dedication, and groundbreaking compositions have cemented his place as one of the most influential figures in music history. Join us as we delve into the captivating biography of this musical genius and explore the fascinating world of Georg Philipp Telemann. From an early age, Telemann displayed an exceptional aptitude for music. As a child, he taught himself to play several instruments, including the violin, keyboard, and flute. His passion for composition flourished during his years at the University of Leipzig, where he immersed himself in the vibrant musical scene of the time. Despite his father's disapproval of a career in music, Telemann's unwavering determination led him to pursue his dreams and embark on a path that would forever change the landscape of classical music.
Telemann - Sonata for Viola da Gamba, TWV 40-1 Georg Philipp Telemann's collection of Twelve Fantasias for Viola da Gamba Solo, TWV 40:26–37, was published in Hamburg in 1735, titled Fantaisies pour la Basse de Violle. The fantasias for viola da gamba were considered lost until an original print was found in a private collection in 2015. They were published by Edition Güntersberg in 2016, and first recorded and performed again by Thomas Fritzsch the same year. Telemann printed the fantasias for viola da gamba in 1735 in his own publishing house in Hamburg. He undertook self-publishing, offering works by subscription: His subscriber lists include buyers from Amsterdam, London and Paris. He offered a 20% discount to subscribers to the fantasias. The fantasias are among Telemann's collections of music for unaccompanied instruments, with others being twelve fantasias for solo flute (1732/33), twelve fantasias for solo violin (1735), and thirty-six pieces for harpsichord (1732–33). Based on research by the French musicologist François-Pierre Goy, the fantasias, which had been thought to be lost, were found in 2015 in an archive of the State Archive of Lower Saxony [de] in Osnabrück. The archive held a complete copy of the music printed by Telemann in 1735 in the private collection from Schloss Ledenburg, now called Ledenburg Collection. The fantasias were published by Edition Güntersberg in 2016, with a facsimile of Telemann's print. After their discovery, the fantasias were first performed by the gambist Thomas Fritzsch, who is also a musicologist teaching at the Leipzig University. Fritzsch played them for the first time after their rediscovery in two concerts as part of the 23rd Magdeburger Telemann-Festtage on 19 and 20 March 2016, along with a recording (made at the abbey church of Zscheiplitz) and the presentation of the edition. We are a cultural channel specializing in classical music. Our goal is to spread classical music to the greatest number of people. Here you will find musics for studying, concentration, relaxing and working. Explore our channel and listen to more works by Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Bach, Haydn, Schumann, Schubert, Vivaldi, Dvorak, Debussy and more! I hope you enjoy it and don't forget to Subscribe. 🎧 🔴 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopClassicalMusic 🔴 WebSite: http://www.melhoresmusicasclassicas.com #MusicHistory #ClassicalMusic #Telemann
Baroque music (US: /bəˈroʊk/ or UK: /bəˈrɒk/) is a period or style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750.[1] This era followed the Renaissance music era, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. Baroque music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, and is now widely studied, performed, and listened to. Key composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Frideric Handel, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, Alessandro Scarlatti, Henry Purcell, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Marc-Antoine Charpentier, Arcangelo Corelli, Tomaso Albinoni, François Couperin, Giuseppe Tartini, Heinrich Schütz, Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Dieterich Buxtehude, and Johann Pachelbel. The Baroque period saw the creation of common-practice tonality, an approach to writing music in which a song or piece is written in a particular key; this kind of arrangement has continued to be used in almost all Western popular music. During the Baroque era, professional musicians were expected to be accomplished improvisers of both solo melodic lines and accompaniment parts. Baroque concerts were typically accompanied by a basso continuo group (comprising chord-playing instrumentalists such as harpsichordists and lute players improvising chords from a figured bass part) while a group of bass instruments—viol, cello, double bass—played the bassline. A characteristic Baroque form was the dance suite. While the pieces in a dance suite were inspired by actual dance music, dance suites were designed purely for listening, not for accompanying dancers. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate[clarification needed] musical ornamentation (typically improvised by performers), made changes in musical notation (the development of figured bass as a quick way to notate the chord progression of a song or piece), and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established the mixed vocal/instrumental forms of opera, cantata and oratorio and the instrumental forms of the solo concerto and sonata as musical genres. Many musical terms and concepts from this era, such as toccata, fugue and concerto grosso are still in use in the 2010s. Dense, complex polyphonic music, in which multiple independent melody lines were performed simultaneously (a popular example of this is the fugue), was an important part of many Baroque choral and instrumental works. The term "baroque" comes from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning "misshapen pearl".[2] Negative connotations of the term first occurred in 1734, in a criticism of an opera by Jean-Philippe Rameau, and later (1750) in a description by Charles de Brosses of the ornate and heavily ornamented architecture of the Pamphili Palace in Rome; and from Jean Jacques Rousseau in 1768 in the Encyclopédie in his criticism of music that was overly complex and unnatural. Although the term continued to be applied to architecture and art criticism through the 19th century, it was not until the 20th century that the term "baroque" was adopted from Heinrich Wölfflin's art-history vocabulary to designate a historical period in music. Baroque Music Collection Hello! Welcome to Top Classical Music, the most comprehensive channel specializing in classical music. Here you will find musics for studying, concentration, relaxing and working. Explore our channel and listen to more works by Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Bach, Haydn, Schumann, Schubert, Vivaldi, Dvorak, Debussy and more! I hope you enjoy it and don't forget to Subscribe. 🎧 🔴 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopClassicalMusic 🔴 WebSite: http://www.melhoresmusicasclassicas.com
Georg Philipp Telemann - Air de Trompette Georg Philipp Telemann (24 March 14 March] 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of that city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died less than two years after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving him. Telemann is one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. As part of his duties, he wrote a considerable amount of music for educating organists under his direction. This includes 48 chorale preludes and 20 small fugues (modal fugues) to accompany his chorale harmonizations for 500 hymns. His music incorporates French, Italian, and German national styles, and he was at times even influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies, and his music stands as an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles. The Telemann Museum in Hamburg is dedicated to him. For more: http://www.melhoresmusicasclassicas.blogspot.com #MusicHistory #ClassicalMusic #Telemann
Georg Philipp Telemann Georg Philipp Telemann (24 March 14 March] 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of that city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died less than two years after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving him. Telemann is one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. As part of his duties, he wrote a considerable amount of music for educating organists under his direction. This includes 48 chorale preludes and 20 small fugues (modal fugues) to accompany his chorale harmonizations for 500 hymns. His music incorporates French, Italian, and German national styles, and he was at times even influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies, and his music stands as an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles. The Telemann Museum in Hamburg is dedicated to him. Matthaus Passion 1. Einleitung 4:10 2. Wenn meine Sund mich kranken 1:14 3. Und es begab sich 1:59 4. Da nun Jesus war zu Bethanien 3:54 5. Hochst unsel´ges Unterfangen 2:28 6. Aber am ersten Tage 6:28 7. Ach Heiland, wie nahret 3:39 8. Ach wie hungert mein Gemute 1:21 9. Und da sie den Lobgesang gesprochen hatten 4:07 10. Bis in den Tod, ach ew´ges Leben 1:59 11. Was ist doch wohl die Ursach solcher Plagen? 0:50 12. Meine wehmutvolle Seele 3:17 13. Du Nacht voll Angst und herbem Seelenleiden 1:25 14. Und ging hin ein wenig 4:51 15. Was ist das Schmeicheln dieser Erden 3:07 16. Jesus aber sprach zu ihm 4:32 17. Dein Mund, ach ew´ges Wort 0:53 18. Und der Hohepriester antwortet 5:56 19. Die Seele wird mir selbst zur Holle 3:01 20. Ich lege mich in dein Erbarmen 3:00 21. Des Morgens aber 1:48 22. Ach wehe, wehe mir 1:31 23. Und er warf die Silberlinge 1:41 24. Ich kann´s mit meinen Sinnen nicht erreichen 0:52 25. Auf das Fest aber 2:26 26. So geht es, keiner rufet Jesum 2:29 27. Pilatus sprach zu ihnen 2:22 28. Lass dich bitt´re Trane netzen 3:42 29. Da nahmen die Kriegsknechte 7:40 30. Gott ruft selbst 3:46 31. Aber Jesus schrie abermal laut und verschied 0:31 32. O grosse Not 0:43 33. Frohlocket, hochbetrubte Seelen 3:10 34. Und siehe da 2:10 35. Es stimmen der gottlichen Lehre zu Ehren 3:04 36. Am Abend aber kam ein reicher Mann 1:30 37. O Traurigkeit, o Herzeleid 0:45 38. So ruhe sanf in deiner Kammer 3:51 39. Nun wir danken dir von Herzen 1:20 For more: http://www.melhoresmusicasclassicas.blogspot.com #MusicHistory #ClassicalMusic #Telemann
Georg Philipp Telemann (was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of that city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving him. Telemann is one of the most prolific composers in history[1] (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre)[2] and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. As part of his duties, he wrote a considerable amount of music for educating organists under his direction. This includes 48 chorale preludes and 20 small fugues (modal fugues) to accompany his chorale harmonizations for 500 hymns. His music incorporates French, Italian, and German national styles, and he was at times even influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies, and his music stands as an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles. The Telemann Museum in Hamburg is dedicated to him. Georg Philipp Telemann Essercizii Musici Part A (12 Solo sonatas) 1. Violin Sonata, TWV 41:F4 3. Flute Sonata, TWV 41:D9 5. Viola da Gamba Sonata, TWV 41:a6 7. Recorder Sonata, TWV 41:d4 9. Oboe Sonata, TWV 41:B6 11. Suite in C major, TWV 32:3 13. Violin Sonata, TWV 41:A6 15. Flute Sonata, TWV 41:G9 17. Viola da gamba Sonata, TWV 41:e5 19. Recorder Sonata, TWV 41:C5 21. Oboe Sonata, TWV 41:e6 23. Suite in C major, TWV 32:3 Part B (12 Trio sonatas) 2. Trio No.1 for Recorder, Oboe, Continuo, TWV 42:c2 4. Trio No.2 for Viola da gamba, Cembalo, Continuo, TWV 42:G6 6. Trio No.3 for Violin, Oboe, Continuo, TWV 42:g5 8. Trio No.4 for Flute, Cembalo, Continuo, TWV 42:A6 10. Trio No.5 for Violin, Recorder, Continuo, TWV 42:a4 12. Trio No.6 for Flute, Viola da gamba, Continuo, TWV 42:h4 14. Trio No.7 for Recorder, Viol, Continuo, TWV 42:F3 16. Trio No.8 for Recorder, Cembalo, Continuo, TWV 42:B4 18. Trio No.9 for Flute, Violin, Cello, Continuo, TWV 42:E4 20. Trio No.10 for Violin, Viola da gamba, Continuo, TWV 42:D9 22. Trio No.11 for Flute, Oboe, Continuo, TWV 42:d4 24. Trio No.12 for Oboe, Cembalo, Continuo, TWV 42:Es3 For more: http://www.melhoresmusicasclassicas.blogspot.com #MusicHistory #ClassicalMusic #Telemann